<
 
 
 
 
×
>
Vous consultez une page Web conservée, recueillie par Bibliothèque et Archives Canada le 2006-10-25 à 18:50:35. Il se peut que les informations sur cette page Web soient obsolètes, et que les liens hypertextes externes, les formulaires web, les boîtes de recherche et les éléments technologiques dynamiques ne fonctionnent pas. Voir toutes les versions de cette page conservée.
Chargement des informations sur les médias

You are viewing a preserved web page, collected by Library and Archives Canada on 2006-10-25 at 18:50:35. The information on this web page may be out of date and external links, forms, search boxes and dynamic technology elements may not function. See all versions of this preserved page.
Loading media information
X
Skip to main content
Text: Native Plant Crossroads. Photo: Bunchberry, Cornus canadensis. Text logo: nature.ca / Canadian Museum of Nature.
Français
Wild columbine, Aquilegia canadensis. Text: What You Can Do. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Text: Conservation Issues. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Text: Resources. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Text: Glossary. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Wild columbine, Aquilegia canadensis. Join us at the crossroads, enrich your understanding of native plants, learn about the issues and find out what you can do!

Native plants are an essential component in the biodiversity that sustains life on Earth. It is imperative that we improve their situation, and we can do so by understanding them better, actively fostering and conserving them, and sharing information.

Stimulating interested citizens to take action towards biodiversity conservation is the ultimate goal of this Web site. This goal is shared by a larger initiative, of which the site is a component: In 2002, the Canadian Centre for Biodiversity at the Canadian Museum of Nature, with the assistance of The Salamander Foundation, initiated Best Stewardship Practices at the Community Level: Enhancing Native Plant Biodiversity. The aim of this initiative is to improve understanding of native plant diversity and facilitate the sharing of information. It does so by encouraging communication, networking and collaboration among diverse groups and active individuals who are involved in environmental stewardship in their communities.

 

The Canadian Museum of Nature's Canadian Centre for Biodiversity is proud to present this Web site, which was generously funded by The Salamander Foundation.

 

Text: People in action. Photo of a park with a creek.

Bring Back the Tadpoles!
A transformation story

White trillium, Trillium grandiflorum S84-4770.
View larger version.

Populations of white trilliums (Trillium grandiflorum) do not expand rapidly because the seeds are dispersed over small distances by insects and mammals. When the berry-like capsules are mature, they open and slowly discharge their seeds. Attracted by an oily appendage on the seeds, ants take the seeds to their nests. Mammals such as chipmunks that take the fruit thereby also help disperse the seeds. Common yellow jacket wasps also consume the fruit, so they may be a secondary agent of dispersal.


 

 
Home | What You Can Do | Conservation Issues | Resources | Glossary | Contact Us | Français
© nature.ca Important Notices
A Canadian Museum of Nature Web site, developed by the Canadian Centre for Biodiversity.
Last Update: 2006-02-23
Images: Corel