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Symposium 2007


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Symposium 2007 E-Mail This Page Print Version
Read the story about the logo

About the Logo

The logo was designed by Dean Ottawa, an artist from the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg (Algonquin) community near Maniwaki, Quebec. It is based on Algonquin designs and images because Symposium 2007 is being held on traditional Algonquin territory.

The logo shows a smudging ceremony with smoke from burning tobacco wafting out of an abalone shell, purifying both people and objects. The smoke represents the passing on of knowledge and traditions from an older person or Elder as represented by the hand holding the shell, to a younger person represented by the smaller hand holding the eagle feather. The smoke also represents the intangible aspects of caring for Aboriginal heritage objects or collections. The smoke merges with and becomes the sweetgrass, which encloses and completes the circle. Sweetgrass symbolizes purification and helps one to focus on the task at hand. The circle symbolizes continuity between the past, present, and future; it also suggests togetherness and harmony. Viewed from a three-dimensional perspective, the circle with the sweetgrass drawn on its side represents a drum, with the sweetgrass being the side of the drum. The drum is a common symbol among most Aboriginal groups. The four coloured circles (white, yellow, red, and black) represent the four geographical directions and the various peoples of the earth.


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Last Updated: 2006-4-7

Important Notices

Home | What’s New | About CCI | Who We Are | CCI In Action | Virtual Tour | Services | Learning Opportunities | CCI Library |
Publications | The Bookstore | Conservation Information Database | CCI Newsletter | CCI Notes | Technical Bulletins | Resources |
Preserving My Heritage Website | BCIN | Links of Interest | Tools | Preservation Framework Online |
Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) Program | Downloads | Feedback | Tell a Colleague About The Site