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FAQs for Teachers

Upon which provincial curricula have the teaching strategies been based?

What can I do to prevent plagiarism in my classroom?

Can I use and distribute the teaching strategies (such as lesson plans, ideas for the classroom, quizzes, games, and activities) I downloaded from the Library and Archives Canada website?

Can teachers and students use texts and images from the Library and Archives Canada website to augment their own materials?

Where can I learn more about using copyright-protected material for educational purposes?

How do I cite electronic sources?


Upon which provincial curricula have the teaching strategies been based?

Wherever possible, teaching strategies and corresponding reading levels have been aligned with all provincial curricula. Learning Outcomes, Expectations and Objectives have been identified for each region. In addition, we have attempted to identify subject material shared by all provincial curricula and to develop resources that will meet needs in those areas.

What can I do to prevent plagiarism in my classroom?

In the age of digital information, plagiarism has become an even greater concern for educators than in the past. It takes little skill or effort for young learners to cut and paste texts into their own work, and then claim credit for it. Although usually easy to detect, it becomes harder as young learners become older and more sophisticated in hiding their efforts. Indeed, the problem has become so widespread that there now exist commercial websites that offer services to detect plagiarism in essays submitted in electronic format.

Fortunately, at least one study 1 suggests that young learners carefully instructed in research methods and on the ethics and dangers of plagiarizing are more likely to follow proper practices. Educators should make the effort.

Below are some links to sites with useful information on plagiarism and prevention.

The Library and Archives Canada website also has a guide on How to Cite Online Documents.

  • From now on : the educational technology journal. -- "The new plagiarism : seven antidotes to prevent highway robbery in an electronic age" [online]. -- Vol. 7, no. 8, May 1998. -- [Cited April 6, 2004]. -- Access: www.fno.org/may98/cov98may.html

Commercial sites that offer plagiarism detection services:


1. Joy H. McGregor and Denise C. Streitenberger, Do Scribes Learn? Copying and Information Use [online], http://www.ala.org/ala/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/slmrb/slmrcontents/
volume11998slmqo/mcgregor.htm
, 1998, accessed April 6, 2004


Can I use and distribute the teaching strategies (such as lesson plans, ideas for the classroom, quizzes, games, and activities) I downloaded from the Library and Archives Canada website?

Before using or distributing teaching strategies (such as lesson plans, ideas for the classroom, quizzes, games, and activities) from the Library and Archives Canada website, please read the copyright information on the Important Notices page.

Can teachers and students use and reproduce texts and images from the Library and Archives Canada website to augment their own materials?

Before using or reproducing texts and images from the Library and Archives Canada website, please read the copyright information on the Important Notices page.

Where can I learn more about using copyright-protected material for educational purposes?

Many Canadian educators have become concerned about the requirements of the new Copyright Act, and how copyrighted works can be used in educational environments. For guidance, refer to the booklet Copyright Matters! Some Key Questions and Answers for Teachers. This is produced by the Council of Ministers of Education and is also available online at www.cmec.ca/else/copyright/matters/indexe.stm.

Other sources for information about copyright:

  • Access Copyright : the Canadian copyright licensing agency [online]. -- [Cited April 6, 2004]. -- Access: www.accesscopyright.ca
    • Access Copyright (formerly CANCOPY) is a Canadian copyright licensing agency that issues blanket licenses allowing educational institutions outside the province of Quebec to make print (not digital) copies without infringing copyright.
  • Association for Media and Technology in Education in Canada. -- Copyright [online]. -- [Cited April 7, 2004]. -- Access: www.amtec.ca/site/copyright/copyrig.shtml
    • This website reports on current copyright issues.
  • Association pour l'avancement des sciences et des techniques de la documentation (ASTED). -- Publications [online]. -- [Cited April 7, 2004]. -- Access: www.asted.org/
    • This section of the ASTED site contains the following French copyright publications:
      - Droit d'auteur en un clin d'oeil
      - Guide du droit d'auteur pour les bibliothèques canadiennes
  • Because We Care Education Society of Alberta. -- What every teacher should know about copyright : a guide @2learn.ca [online]. -- [Cited April 6, 2004]. -- Access: www.2learn.ca/copyright/copy.html
    • This website provides guidance in copyright compliance to both creators and users of original online material.
  • Cable in the Classroom [online]. -- [Cited April 7, 2004]. -- Access: www.cableducation.ca/
    • This is a website about CITC's copyright-cleared cable television programming for educational use.
  • Canadian Library Association (CLA). -- Copyright Information Centre [online]. -- [Cited April 7, 2004]. -- Access: www.cla.ca/resources/copyright.htm
    • On this site, you will find useful copyright information and publications such as:
      - Copyright Guide for Canadian Libraries
      - Canadian Copyright Law
      - What you need to know about the new Copyright Act
      - Copyright in Canada. Media Awareness Network. This is a resource for educators with questions about Canadian copyright law, particularly those concerning "fair dealing" classroom-use rights; media materials and public performance rights; the Access Copyright license agreement; and other educational-use copyright concerns.
  • Canadian School Boards Association [online]. -- [Cited April 7, 2004]. -- Access: www.cdnsba.org/
    • This website offers a list of questions and answers related to copyright in the classroom.
  • The Canadian Teacher's Federation [online]. -- [Cited April 7, 2004]. -- Access: www.ctf-fce.ca/
  • Copibec : société québécoise de gestion collective des droits de reproduction [online]. -- [Cited April 6, 2004]. -- Access: www.copibec.qc.ca
    • Copibec is a Canadian copyright licensing agency that issues blanket licenses authorizing educational institutions within the province of Quebec to make print (not digital) copies without infringing copyright.
  • Copyright Board Canada [online]. -- [Cited April 7, 2004]. -- Access: www.cb-cda.gc.ca/
    • The Copyright Board's website posts articles on current issues and recent decisions regarding copyright, and provides general related information and links.
  • Council of Ministers of Education, Canada. -- Copyright in education [online]. -- [Cited April 6, 2004]. -- Access: www.cmec.ca/copyright/indexe.stm
    • This site contains a complete transcript of the current Access Copyright agreement and other resources related to copyright in the schools, including Copyright Matters! Some Key Questions and Answers for Teachers. CMEC's website also contains links to every ministry and department of education.
  • Department of Canadian Heritage. -- Copyright Policy [online]. -- [Cited April 7, 2004]. -- Access: www.pch.gc.ca/progs/ac-ca/progs/pda-cpb/index_e.cfm
    • This is the website of the Department of Canadian Heritage branch responsible for implementing Canadian copyright policy.

How do I cite electronic sources?

No single format for citing electronic sources has yet been accepted by any of the major style guides. However, Library and Archives Canada offers a guide on How to Cite Online Documents. The Saskatchewan Ministry of Education has an excellent guide for different citation formats on its Citation Styles page www.sasked.gov.sk.ca/resources/lib4_hom.html; and the American Library of Congress can be referenced for MLA and Turabian styles (American Memory Learning Page: Citing Electronic Sources http://learning.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/start/cite/index.html).